Our Flood History website explained

Phillip Midgely December 21, 2016 Data capture, Web

Home News Our Flood History website explained

In recent months our team has been developing updates to our Flood History website. Initially developed to support a Water Engineering and Management (WEM) package tender, it needed to capture and display historic flood data on an easy-to-use map.

In recent months teams from our Systems, Software and Data (SSD) department have been developing updates to our Flood History website. Initially developed to support a Water Engineering and Management (WEM) package tender, it needed to capture and display historic flood data on an easy-to-use map.

The site was designed to be ‘portable’ across different regions and we have since deployed a site specifically for the Ulverston region. As well as providing a means for collecting, storing and analysing locally-held information on historic flooding, this new Ulverston site has been designed to support flood model validation by comparing our model output data to real historic flooding information.

Model validation using the Flood History website followed two stages. In Stage 1, the website provided a central repository for data from previous floods – e.g. telemetry records, wrack marks, photography/CCTV and media reports. Information from local consultees was also used that allowed a qualitative understanding of important factors relevant to and significant for the flood mechanisms being considered for development. Collaboration with project partners and local consultees was vital at this stage to gain a comprehensive and accurate library of historical flood data.

Hydraulic models were developed in Stage 2 and when initial results were available, we re-engaged with the key project partners and local consultees to confirm that model outputs and internal behaviours were consistent with their knowledge of flooding within Ulverston.

We present the draft model data from previous events and more frequent design scenarios in the website alongside information collected during Stage 1. We make use of a range of model outputs (e.g. maximum extent maps, animations, velocity vectors, depth and hazard rating) to encourage debate/challenge. Draft model outputs are also available via WMS/WFS feeds to allow off-line comparison with other data held by project partners within their respective organisations.

For information on the Flood History website, contact Phillip Midgley on 01756 699500.